Memorial Tun Hussein Onn

 

A. Design Concept
The new Memorial Tun Hussein Onn MTHO is designed to replace its old location, as part of the redevelopment of Bukit Perdana comprising of the National Archive’s Memorial complexes and Central Bank’s Financial Education Campus.
The 4 storey building accommodates a main gallery, a ramped seasonal gallery, a multipurpose hall, archive rooms and office facilities. The main gallery located on the first floor will house materials relating to Tun Hussein Onn, the nation’s 3rd Prime Minister.
Ensconced between several existing buildings designed from the eras of the colonial to the 90’s, the unique location calls for a design that would not intimidate, but assimilate the various contrasting architectural styles. Extensive use of the green roof gives an impression an extended landscape onto the roof which forms the new peak of Bukit Perdana. The terraced garden decks create possibilities for outdoor spaces overlooking the old Prime Minister Office and the 360 degrees KL skyline.
The new building’s strategic position will connect all the 3 Memorial Complexes namely, Memorial Tunku Abdul Rahman, Memorial Tun Hussein Onn, and Memorial Negarawan, which were accessed separately in the past. All in all, the new building echoes Tun Hussein Onn’s low profile personality and his contribution which grants him the soubriquet “Bapa Perpaduan” (Father of Unity).
It is hoped the building would contribute not only to instil patriotism to the public, but also inculcate green lifestyles to the future generation.

B. Green building features
Passive Energy Efficient Features
• Daylighting
o Lobbies and work spaces are provided with large windows to maximise daylight. For the ramp gallery, long shallow windows provide subtle ambient lighting with minimal glare.

• Greenery
o The green roof is part of the passive design to achieve the desired green agenda. They mitigate the urban heat island and increase longevity of roofing membranes. The roof-top turfs reduce noise and air pollution, provide a more aesthetically pleasing and healthy environment to work and live, and improve return on investment compared to traditional roofs. As most of heat gain on a low-rise building comes from the roof, green roof is an efficient insulation to reduce the air-condition loading to conserve energy. To further control heat gain into the building, a revolving door is installed at the main entrance.
• Heat Gain and glare
o As most of heat gain on a low-rise building comes from the roof, green roof is an efficient insulation to reduce the air-condition loading to conserve energy. To further control heat gain into the building, a revolving door is installed at the main entrance.
o The dilemma between natural lighting and heat gain entering the glass opening, has always been part of the challenge in any green building design. A unique feature of the building includes the slightly angled cantilever on the sides which create a shadow line that cast shades to the telescopic window line. This was planned from the early design stage through sun-path simulation at various times of the year.
• Rainwater harvesting
o As part of the storm water management system, the green roof reduces the surface water runoff before entering the on-site detention pond located in the basement. Part of the rainwater collection is also harvested for irrigation. This would significantly reduce potable water consumption usually used to maintain the extensive roof-top grass area.
• Renewable energy

• EMS

• Lighting

C. Fire Safety
Passive firefighting strategy is also built into the building form. The roof terraces are designed as means of egress during fire evacuation. The building has a single staircase with two escape routes via the green terrace. As a public building with seasonal maximum capacity, escape path via open air terrace provides a safer route than conventional staircase.